Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Tasteless Grapes

It’s hard to buy good fruit in winter in Alberta.  Our -20° Celsius weather isn’t conducive to growth of any kind of fruit or vegetable!

Over the last few weeks I’ve been fortunate enough to find some nice tasty grapes in Superstore.  This week, expecting consistent grape quality, I bought another package. 

Apparently it’s no longer grape season wherever these were grown.  I’ve had sweet grapes, sour grapes, crunchy grapes, squishy grapes, seedless grapes, and even monster grapes, but I’ve never quite tasted grapes like these.

They were completely tasteless.  I can’t even say they qualified as bland or bad, just completely void of flavor.

If you know me at all, you’ll know I’m…well what’s the word?  Let’s call it thrifty.  If I’ve paid for food I’m not about to throw it out. I’ll stuff it down whether I like it or not.  But I just couldn’t do it with these grapes.

I tried.  I munched down a few, trying to convince myself they didn’t really taste bad.  I was still getting nutrition and fiber from them, but my taste buds grew more outraged with every grape I put in my mouth.

I tried to figure out why flavorless grapes were so offensive, and then it occurred to me - all food has a taste.  It might be good or it might be bad, or even mediocre, but it all tastes like something.  As I was pondering this thought, a statement from Jesus popped into my mind.

“You are the salt of the earth.  But if the salt loses it saltiness, how can it be made salty again?   It is no longer good for anything, except to be thrown out and trampled underfoot.”  Matthew 5:13 (NIV)

And what about this one…

“I know your deeds, that you are neither cold nor hot.  I wish you were either one or the other!  So, because you are lukewarm – neither hot nor cold – I am about to spit you out of my mouth.”  Revelation 3:15-16 (NIV)

I’m not sure I truly appreciated the meaning behind these verses until I had my tasteless grape experience.  I actually did want to spit them out of my mouth!  How can salt not be salty?  How can grapes not be…well…grapey? 

And continuing with the analogy, what good are Christians if we’re not leading Christ-like lives.  If we’re neutral about our faith what kind of witness are we?  If we’re not passionate about shining the light of Christ, but simply come across as blasé about our faith, what good are we in the world?

Grapes should taste like grapes.  Salt should taste like salt.  Christians should strive to be like Christ, not only in their churches, but in their homes and communities, too.


What does your life say about your faith?  Are you living out your Christianity or are you a tasteless grape?

Share your thoughts by clicking on “comments” below.

Friday, November 7, 2014

Saul's Leadership Lesson - What Not To Do - Lesson #4

We left Saul last week as he was about to lead his army into battle against the Philistines.  His army is successful and the Philistines flee.  The Israelite army pursues the Philistines, determined to drive them back.

Here’s the unexpected twist.  Saul decrees that his entire army is to fast until victory over the Philistines is complete.  Everyone except Saul’s son, Jonathan, knows about this.  Empty stomachs and the physical labour of battle don’t mix well.  By evening the men are weak and tired.

Ironically the army comes across food in the forest, but refuses to touch it because of Saul’s order.  Jonathan, not knowing any better, eats his fill and is refreshed. 

Later that evening Saul wants to continue to chase the Philistines, but the priest intervenes telling Saul to ask God what to do next.  Saul agrees, but no answer comes from God.  Saul suspects sin in the army is the reason God isn’t answering.

He gathers all his army leaders and demands to know what’s happened.

“Then Saul said to the leaders, ‘Something’s wrong!  I want all my army commanders to come here.  We must find out what sin was committed today.  I vow by the name of the Lord who rescued Israel that the sinner will surely die, even if it is my own son Jonathan!’  But no one would tell him what the trouble was.”   1 Samuel 14:38-40

Isn’t it interesting...not one of Saul’s leaders has the courage to speak up and tell him the guilty party is his own son? 

I suspect no one speaks up because someone had the misfortune of speaking truth to Saul before and it didn’t go well.  Perhaps Saul subscribes to the “shoot the messenger” theory…literally.

Saul doesn’t strike me as the type of guy who’s open to suggestions from the people, but as a leader it’s important to maintain an open dialogue with your staff.  Team members should feel comfortable making suggestions that will improve the work place.

Saul’s Leadership Lesson #4
Stay humble and open enough that your leadership team and staff are comfortable bringing ideas to you.  Keep an open dialogue between you and your staff.